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Author:Laita, Mark
Monday, 15 July 2013 | Read more
Author:ZoneZero
CALL FOR ENTRIES American Illustration-American Photography (AI-AP), the leading juried annuals in North America, honors the best work being created today in Latin America. AI-AP, well-known for 32 years as the exclusive resource for art directors, designers, photo editors, art buyers and publishers seeks to introduce established, emerging and student Latino illustrators and photographers to the North American market - and vice versa - in a global, multi-cultural exchange of art and ideas. Latin American Fotografía and Ilustración will be judged by an international jury of top creatives who commission illustration and photography for use in magazines, advertising, books, posters, packaging, promotion, and video. Unpublished, fine art and student work will also be eligible.   The collection of winning Latin American Fotografía and Ilustración images will be presented at the annual American Illustration-American Photography launch party in New York City in November 2013 - the most anticipated networking event of the year that brings photographers, illustrators and creatives together to celebrate the year's winning images. The winning Latin American Fotografía and Ilustración collection will be included in the following: Presentation at the AI-AP events in New York City, November 2013. Exhibition at Photoville, Brookly NY, September 2013. Winner's slideshow announcement sent to AI-AP's 30,000 global email subscribers. Inclusion in The ARCHIVE, our exclusive, searchable web gallery at: www.ai-ap.com which receives over 200 unique visitors daily. Images will include illustrator's and photographer's contact, caption and creative credits. Features in DART: Design Arts Daily, Pro Photo Daily and Dispatched from Latin America, our three AI-AP newsletters sent to over 25,000 subscribers.  Traveling exhibit in North and South America through 2014.
Monday, 03 June 2013
Author:Elisa Rugo
Wednesday, 22 May 2013 | Read more
Author:Parkeharrison, Robert & Shana
Friday, 03 May 2013 | Read more
Author:Webmaster
Ximena Morfín | Ciudad de México   Result of the workshop ¨Luz Natural, fotografía de moda¨ given by Carlos Somonte of the Fundación Pedro Meyer November 2012       Ximena Morfín (Mexico City) has been interested in photography since she was 14. Her parents worked in image management and audiovisual language, meaning that she has been in contact with this medium all her life.   A year later, in 2010, she began her studies at the Mexico City campus of the Active Photography School, from which she graduated in December 2010. Throughout her career, she has discovered that the type of photography she enjoys most is portraiture, particularly fashion portraits.   She has twice taken part in group exhibitions at the La Candela gallery, and was also part of the Active Gaze collective portrait exhibition held at the La Torre Cultural Center in 2012.   She has a diploma in Image Analysis from the course taught by Gladiola Espinoza at the Active Photography School.   Now 18, she is mainly interested in increasing her knowledge of fashion and growing in the photography sphere, as a result of which she assists Mexican photographer Ximena del Valle with advertising and artistic productions.     INTERVIEW   ZZ. Where did your interest in fashion photography come from?   X.M. Throughout my training at the Active Photography School, I developed a taste for portraits. I gradually discovered that I liked to pay attention to simple elements and details, to create precise compositions. Later on I discovered Patrick Demarchelier, a pillar of fashion photography. Finally, it was thanks to Susan Sontag, in whose book On photography I found a sentence that gave a little more meaning to everything: “(...) fashion photography is based on the fact that something can be more beautiful in a photograph than in real life (…).” That was how my interest in fashion photography began.   ZZ. What was your personal experience of working with a team of stylists, wardrobe specialists and modelers to construct the scene?   X.M. I love fashion photography because it involves a lot of teamwork. I find the idea of complementing each other, each one contributing their talent, priceless. The way I see it, there is always a great deal to learn from others when you work on a production. Knowing that someone is working towards the same objective as you. As a photographer, there is nothing better than a good team.   ZZ. Do you believe that fashion photography has elements of narrative discourse?   X.M. Obviously. In my opinion, the most important thing when creating fashion photography is that it contains a story. I cannot imagine fashion photography without narrative discourse. Creating a good photograph will always be more interesting and beneficial if there is something to tell rather than simply taking photographs for the sake of it.   ZZ. How do you establish a dialogue with the subject or the photographic model?   X.M. I believe there always has to be a link between the subject and the photograph. Both are working to achieve an effective result. It is always better to work in a relaxed, trusting atmosphere, in which your model and the whole production team are striving to collaborate and work successfully. The best way to establish a dialogue with your model is to know what you want.   ZZ. Are you currently working on a particular project? Tell us about it.   X.M. Yes I am working on a photographic essay on Sigmund Freud’s book Introduction to Psychoanalysis. It involves creating portraits that reflect the most important aspects of each chapter, translating concepts into visual language. For example, for the chapter that deals with “Failed acts” I created the following image that evokes oral mistakes.  
Wednesday, 06 March 2013
Author:Webmaster
Julio Rivera | Ciudad de México Result of the workshop "Cuerpo y fotografía" given by Luana Navarro of the Fundación Pedro Meyer November 2012   Julio Rivera (June 1986) graduated as a graphic communication designer from the Autonomous Metropolitan University, and has since completed this training, his first approach to photography, with several workshops.   Despite his short career as a photographer, he has participated in several group exhibitions and his work has been published in a variety of media..   He is currently working as an independent photographer, devoting most of his time to personal projects.     INTERVIEW   ZZ. Is there one photograph that has changed the way you perceive images? Which photograph is this, and why? J.R. Tomoko in the bath by Eugene Smith is both a heartbreaking and sumptuously beautiful image. When I first saw it I discovered photography’s tremendous ability to speak of life, man and everything that we are capable of doing, from the most despicable acts, reflected in Tomoko’s body, to the most sublime, such as the deep love in his mother’s expression.   ZZ. Do you think the fiction produced in the virtual environment we inhabit can be used in your work? J.R. Of course it can, though I have not used it very much. I have always believed that fiction can be used to speak of the "truth", to criticize and question it. A clear example of this is the Deconstructing Osama de Fontcuberta project.   ZZ. What do you aim to achieve when you depict the body in your photographic work? J.R. This has been my most personal project so far. Witnessing the death of two relatives was an extremely powerful experience. In both cases the journey towards death was slow and painful, and seeing these events made me profoundly afraid, not of death itself but rather that what precedes it, the inevitable decline of the body. Since I usually resort to denial, Memento is a means of facing up to this fear, exposing my body (albeit in a fictional way) to its own process of decay to capture the unavoidable and increase my awareness of it. It is a kind of catharsis through which I try to accept a natural process even if I don’t really like it, a natural process, to somehow achieve a sense of peace.   ZZ. Do you think that photographic expression relating to the body crosses the line between the public and the private? J.R. I perceive the public and private as subjective aspects. Today, the vast production of images has made the body an entirely public subject. I think that now, privacy is what we feel or think; we all have bodies but we do not all think alike. I believe that if it is necessary to photograph a naked body to reveal something truly private, then it is worth crossing that line.   ZZ. Are you currently working on a particular project? Please tell us about it. J.R. It is difficult to define when a project is finished. As time goes by my perception of the word changes, as does my interpretation of my own images. In this respect some of my projects are in a constant process of re-signification, and at the moment I am considering taking up an earlier project. For Rooms (http://proyectohabitaciones.tumblr.com) the original subject was how impersonal relationships can become when the virtual becomes excessive, but now I think I can offer a more profound interpretation that enhances the project and allows it to grow.  
Wednesday, 06 March 2013
Author:Webmaster
Valentina Jiménez | Ciudad de México   Result of the workshop "Bitácora Visual" given by Nirvana Paz and Bruno Bresani of the Fundación Pedro Meyer Febrero 2013     Valentina Jiménez Lara (Mexico City) has been interested in art from an early age; her mother was always taking her to painting and photography exhibitions.   Valentina taught herself about painting, especially watercolors and embroidery on paper.   In February of 2013, she enrolled in the Visual Blog course at the Pedro Meyer Foundation, where she experienced a growing interest in photography. She found it to be a form of personal exploration, which was also possible to express and work on artistically.   Valentina will continue with the second level of the Portfolio course at the Pedro Meyer Foundation and intends to continue in the field of art, not only in photography but exploring various artistic disciplines such as painting and video.     INTERVIEW   ZZ. Why photography?? V.J. I used to paint, then I found out about this course and signed up for it. This is my first contact with photography, although I have always liked art in general.   ZZ. What do you think about the Visual Blog? V.J. What I liked most about this course was the ability to come into contact with other artists and the artistic processes of others. I liked it a lot, it provided a seed to keep searching-   ZZ. What came first, the clarity of having a project or the possibility of having SONY equipment? V.J. The project, the opportunity to discuss my current project, which has to do with my intimacy and my situation. This came about as a result of an interview with Ana Casas, in which she talked about the importance of speaking from oneself and of experience as a starting point for creating visual discourse. This is easier to convey because it is the most honest and richest, it is something that is completely yours. On the basis of this idea I chose to talk about my decision to have a child at 17.   ZZ. Why did you choose portraits to express a personal problem? V.J. Among other artists, during Visual Blog, we also saw the work of Martin Romers, who portrays Second World War veterans, which I found very powerful. The impact of a portrait and the way it strips a person’s features bare, especially because he manages to blur parts of the face, so that the person’s gaze is intensified. In the workshop, we saw the importance of the eyes, and of looking and seeing the other. I thought it was the best initial approach for dealing with what I want to talk about: doing portraits that speak of others that are also a portrait of me. I speak from my own perspective and through others..   ZZ. What benefits have you found in the Sony Grant? V.J. For me it was important to have the fellowship and the camera because I do not have that standard of equipment. The Sony camera has several options and since I am a beginner, I was able to apply what I was learning, play with speed and the diaphragm and so on. The thing is that having a professional camera is a whole new ball game. I used an Alfa 57 and it was very convenient; it lets you see the changes you make on the screen, which makes things easier and clearer.     ZZ. What stage of the process do you think your project is at? V.J. This is the beginning. I can find other ways of interpreting my experience, and show them in various artistic ways. I think of this series as the basis for further work on teenage motherhood, until this situation is normalized, and as a way to move the discussion beyond the curiosity I have experienced and witnessed. I want to show everything that is involved in making this decision to have a child, and to have an abortion. I try to go one step further, so that people can see beyond appearances.   ZZ. What are you going to do next? V.J. I'm only just beginning. I will always find more things to believe and express what I want. I think that photography is a medium in which you can convey a lot, but I want to learn and continue with different artistic disciplines in order to express myself. Today that means photography and motherhood.         
Wednesday, 06 March 2013
Author:fernando
Mauricio Ramírez | Ciudad de México   Resultado del taller "Bitácora Visual" impartido por Nirvana Paz y Bruno Bresani de la Fundación Pedro Meyer Febrero 2013   "Beso" por Mauricio Ramírez. Duración 2:25 min. Junio 2013   Mauricio Ramírez Menchaca (Ciudad de México) Su interés por la imagen surge desde pequeño. Su padre, aficionado al collage y al dibujo, lo introduce al lenguaje visual a temprana edad. A los 14 años comienza a hacer fotografía por diversión, hobby que más adelante se convertirá en su pasión. En el 2010 decide iniciarse en la educación fotográfica y comienza a prepararse en el taller central de fotografía del IPN. En 2011 participa en el festival "Fotoseptiembre" con una exposición colectiva dedicada al movimiento. Después de haber participado en el taller "Bitácora Visual" en la Fundación Pedro Meyer, decide seguir preparándose e incursionar de lleno en el medio de las artes visuales. Actualmente se encuentra cursando el taller "Portafolios" también en la FPM.     ENTREVISTA   ZZ. ¿Cómo o de dónde nace tu interés en la fotografía? M.R. Mi interés por la fotografía nace desde niño, realizar las fotografías familiares me emocionaba mucho y en la escuela le tome mas seriedad, el ver que mis fotos gustaban a los demás me motivo a hacerlo de manera profesional.   ZZ. Cuéntanos cuál ha sido tu experiencia al cursar Bitácora Visual. M.R. Ha sido muy gratificante el haber estado en Bitácora Visual. Esta experiencia me permitió ampliar mi visión y criterio fotográfico y de esa manera hacer mejor mi trabajo y al mismo tiempo me alentó a realizar proyectos con más significado.   ZZ. ¿Cuál fue la razón por la que decidiste utilizar el video como formato de presentación de tu trabajo? M.R. En el taller de Bitácora Visual tuve la oportunidad de conocer referencias de algunos artistas y me di cuenta que las imágenes tienen otras formas de mostrarse y quise aventurarme en hacer algo diferente a lo que había hecho.   ZZ. ¿Qué beneficios encontraste en el equipo Sony como herramienta de trabajo en el desarrollo de tu proyecto? M.R. La mayor ventaja que encontré fue al acceso al menú a comparacion con otros equipos, y una limitante puede ser la compatibilidad con accesorios genéricos.   ZZ. Por último, platícanos acerca de los proyectos en los que trabajas actualmente o planeas desarrollar en un futuro. M.R. Actualmente me encuentro en el taller "Portafolios" de la Fundación Pedro Meyer por que me pareció una oportunidad fabulosa para desarrollar mis proyectos futuros. Ahora trabajo en un par de proyectos, el primero es un homenaje a la comunidad lesbico-gay y el otro son autorretratos que reflejen el "yo interno" reprimido; en ambos trabajos quiero proyectar la represión que nosotros mismo nos imponemos por culpa de los estereotipos sociales. Con ambas propuestas intento conseguir una beca para trabajar en un proyecto en una comunidad en el estado de Yucatán.       
Wednesday, 06 March 2013
Author:fernando
Pedro Góngora | Ciudad de México   Result of the workshop "Portafolios: Edición y producción fotográfica" given by Adriana Raggi and Bruno Bresani of the Fundación Pedro Meyer Febrero 2013       Pedro A. Góngora (Mexico City, 1978) graduated as an engineer in 2002.   He has since worked in numerous locations, including as a university professor, and considers himself an eternal student. He is currently extremely busy with his personal photography projects, his doctoral thesis at the National Autonomous University of Mexico and his main job as a programmer.       INTERVIEW   ZZ. Where did your interest for photography come from? P.G. To be honest, it began very casually. I had been taking countless courses and workshops, in art history, music and literature. After a while I wanted to begin a project of my own, but was not sure what to do. Almost by chance, I enrolled in a cyanotype workshop with Nirvana Paz, and became hooked on photography. I began to take photographs with my cell phone and ordinary cameras, then gradually discovered that it was the medium that gave me the most freedom to express myself. I looked for more courses, and learnt about the Visual Log Book at the Pedro Meyer Foundation. I then took the Portfolios course and now have a couple of projects underway.   ZZ. As a person devoted to the sciences, your vision of photography is different to that of a person involved in the arts or humanities. How would you define this difference? P.G. I believe that as a spectator, anyone can appreciate a photographic work. The differences in the way a work moves you may be cultural and depend on the degree of contact you have with certain topics. However, as a creator I believe there are broader differences. In science, the decisions you take in a project have a very functional direction, based on measurable, arguably objective parameters. Whereas in the case of an artistic project, decisions tend to be guided by subjective criteria, which requires a personal sensitivity beyond the more tangible or visible result. However, of course, I can only speak from my own experience.   ZZ. Where did the idea for this project come from? P.G. The idea emerged around that very issue - the confrontation of two manners of creating and relating to art. Moreover, photography also involves a historical and cultural opposition between the objective and subjective, which is perhaps why I feel so close to the medium.   ZZ. What future projects and plans will you continue to develop in the visual arts? P.G. In addition to finishing my current projects, I want to continue learning and producing. I believe that, in the long term, what I would most like would be to link these two parts of my life.         
Wednesday, 06 March 2013
Author:fernando
Gabriela Olmedo | Ciudad de México   Resultado del taller "Contextos y personajes, el retrato como documento social" impartido por Nicola Ókin Frioli de la Fundación Pedro Meyer. Septiembre 2013           Nace el 24 de enero de 1976 en la ciudad de México.   Gabriela es egresada de la Licenciatura en Mercadotecnia por el Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey ITESM (2000) y Maestra en Humanidades por la Universidad Anáhuac (2003).   En 2004, decidió retomar la fotografía en la Escuela Activa de fotografía y desde entonces redescubrió su amor, su pasión  y su camino definitivo.   Desde entonces, amplió su formación académica a través de numerosos cursos en el International Center of Photography (ICP) de Nueva York, en la Fundación Pedro Meyer y con los afamados fotógrafos internacionales Pedro Meyer, Daniel Weinstock y en repetidas ocasiones y actualmente con Mary Ellen Mark.   Entre sus trabajos destacan las fotografías familiares, los proyectos corporativos, los de productos, y los retratos personales.   Adicional a ello, también se ha enfocado a realizar proyectos personales, fotografía documental y de arte y ha publicado su obra en varias revistas y periódicos.   En el 2012 fue acreedora de una beca con el fotógrafo Daniel Weinstock y en el 2013 fue la ganadora de la Beca SONY por la Fundación Pedro Meyer en el taller: Contextos y Personajes: el retrato como documento social, impartido por Nicola Ókin Frioli.     INTERVIEW   ZZ. What motivates you to take photographs? A.P. I like to tell people about what is happening to me, it’s like a sort of “exorcism” process…  Recently, it has been a very intimate experience, and somehow by taking photographs, I begin to recognize myself and understand what is happening inside me. I feel that photography sees right into me, and shapes my inner world.   ZZ. What elements do you take into consideration as you produce images? A.P. Lighting and composition. I am learning to lend coherence to images in a series, to establish a relationship between each of them. My proposal for this series is more formal. I also believe that all the details and elements involved in creating a discourse are very important.   ZZ. Where did you get the idea for this project? A.P. It all began with a memory. When I was a child, I felt that my body was very large, like a strange object that did not belong to me. I began to explore that memory through images, trying to represent it. When I explored it, I realized that it related to what I had been taught about being a woman: how I should be, look and behave, and my place in society. In that regard, the process of undertaking this project has been very revealing, as it made me see that my current perception of my body has been imposed on me, and does not reflect reality. Despite our years together, my body is still something strange and incomprehensible to me.   ZZ. What are the advantages of working with Sony equipment? A.P. I appreciated the creative options offered by the equipment, which inspired me to create my project. The focus option, which I found strange at first as I was not used to it, was very helpful when doing my self-portrait.         
Wednesday, 06 March 2013
Author:fernando
Anahit Paula | Ciudad de México   Result of the workshop "Bitácora Visual, Introducción al lenguaje fotográfico" given by Nirvana Paz and Xavier Aguirre of the Fundación Pedro Meyer June 2013           I have been interested in art since a young age, and began with drawing and painting. My Mom noticed this interest and took me to all kinds of art workshops for children.    Later, at high school, I liked to play truant with a friend and go to her photography workshop at an art school, which was my first contact with photography and the black and white darkroom.   Throughout my life I have had all sorts of jobs, working in theater for many years and as a Jazz instruments technician at the Conservatory. This used to be a source of conflict for me, but now is something exciting, a tool that I can use to carry out my projects.   Photography has fascinated me since I was a child, when I used to take photos with my Mom’s 120mm camera and regarded it as a work of magic and patience. These days it is an oasis in which I can recreate myself and reconcile contrasting aspects of my identity.       INTERVIEW   ZZ. What motivates you to take photographs? A.P. I like to tell people about what is happening to me, it’s like a sort of “exorcism” process…  Recently, it has been a very intimate experience, and somehow by taking photographs, I begin to recognize myself and understand what is happening inside me. I feel that photography sees right into me, and shapes my inner world.   ZZ. What elements do you take into consideration as you produce images? A.P. Lighting and composition. I am learning to lend coherence to images in a series, to establish a relationship between each of them. My proposal for this series is more formal. I also believe that all the details and elements involved in creating a discourse are very important.   ZZ. Where did you get the idea for this project? A.P. It all began with a memory. When I was a child, I felt that my body was very large, like a strange object that did not belong to me. I began to explore that memory through images, trying to represent it. When I explored it, I realized that it related to what I had been taught about being a woman: how I should be, look and behave, and my place in society. In that regard, the process of undertaking this project has been very revealing, as it made me see that my current perception of my body has been imposed on me, and does not reflect reality. Despite our years together, my body is still something strange and incomprehensible to me.   ZZ. What are the advantages of working with Sony equipment? A.P. I appreciated the creative options offered by the equipment, which inspired me to create my project. The focus option, which I found strange at first as I was not used to it, was very helpful when doing my self-portrait.         
Wednesday, 06 March 2013
Author:Astrid Rodríguez
  Portraits of Time is a three-part work in which I narrate my own story, using photographs to represent three generations: my daughter, my mother and myself. We are permanently linked to art, sharing a similar passion and way of life, and the landscape symbolizes freedom of thought, soul and spirit, allowing each of us to express herself, speak, flow and live.   To carry out this work I used two entirely different kinds of cameras: a stenopeic one and an iPhone. I gave the photographs a square format and fused and manipulated them digitally, to represent a parallel in time whereby years ago there was only analogue photography, but now iPhone exists. So I mixed both techniques and cameras, merging the past with the present, portraying time itself…  
Friday, 18 January 2013
Author:Weber, Donald
Thursday, 06 December 2012 | Read more
Author:Hornstra, Rob
Monday, 03 December 2012 | Read more
Author:López, Marcos
Monday, 19 November 2012 | Read more
Author:Webmaster
Arturo Pizá Malvido | Tlaxcala Resultado del taller "Luz" impartido por Eniac Martínez de la Fundación Pedro Meyer SEMBLANZA ENTREVISTA   Arturo Pizá Malvido (Tlaxcala, 1969) es hijo de padre siciliano y madre tamaulipeca. Nació con el pie plano, lengua de mapa y un dispositivo intrauterino (DIU) incrustado en la sutura craneal que divide al frontal del parietal izquierdos.   Estudió Comunicación (UIA, D.F.) y tiene una especialidad en medios audiovisuales (Claustro de Sor Juana, D.F.). Ha transitado por Morelos, Quintana Roo, D.F. y Veracruz, estado en donde actualmente radica. Se ha desempeñado como locutor, escritor y productor de proyectos publicitarios y culturales en distintos medios de comunicación.   Fue catedrático de fotografía e imagen digital en la Escuela Gestalt de Diseño, en Xalapa, Veracruz. En la actualidad dirige su estudio fotográfico privado en el que explora el retrato y el desnudo, a la par de su trabajo publicitario.     ZZ. Arturo, tu padre es siciliano y tu madre tamaulipeca; sin duda una combinación singular ¿De qué manera tu origen ha marcado la forma en la que realizas tus proyectos?   Supongo que de alguna forma, aunque —para serte franco— nunca pienso en jaibas que hablan como Brando en película de Coppola. Mi padre fue piloto aviador y se hizo añicos en un avión haciendo piruetas, eso sí que me marcó de por vida.   ZZ. ¿Estás trabajando en algún proyecto personal en este momento? ¿Cuál es?   En lo mismo de siempre, en el desnudo, en el límite de lo permisible. Hago fotografía “erótica” (así, entre comillas) cuando el tiempo y la oportunidad me lo permiten. Me empecino en ese “abismo insalvable” de Bataille.   ZZ. Te has desarrollado como locutor, escritor y productor de proyectos publicitarios y culturales; esto te debe dar cierta facilidad para narrar con la imagen, ¿no? Para ti, ¿qué cuenta una imagen que no pudieras decir con palabras?   Lo visual y lo escrito, las imágenes y las palabras, son lenguajes distintos que no hay por qué verlos enemistados, sino diferentes y, a veces, complementarios. Ciertamente hay cosas o situaciones indescriptibles, pero —también— hay frases o párrafos tan bien puestos que cualquier imagen construida o incidental, decepciona.   ZZ. El taller que tomaste en la Fundación Pedro Meyer se enfocaba en la "luz". ¿De qué manera consideras que la sombra forma parte de tu discurso fotográfico?   A riesgo de sonar trillado, la sombra es el como el silencio en la música. Luz y sombra se complementan. Imposible uno sin el otro. Es dialéctica, es contrapunto. Precisamente esto que bobamente explico fue el quid a explorar durante el taller de Eniac Martínez.   ZZ. Descríbenos una foto que te hubiera gustado tomar y por alguna razón no tomaste.   Mejor te hablo de una imagen de la que no hay fotografía, pero que sería más amarga que La muerte de Marat. Sería el pequeño Emil Cioran y sus pocos compañeritos de juego practicando futbol… con un cráneo humano. Esa foto, no otra.   Sony SLT-A57K http://www.zonezero.com/zz/templates/sony-zonezero/images/becarios/piza/01.jpg Sony SLT-A57K http://www.zonezero.com/zz/templates/sony-zonezero/images/becarios/piza/02.jpg Sony SLT-A57K http://www.zonezero.com/zz/templates/sony-zonezero/images/becarios/piza/03.jpg Sony SLT-A57K http://www.zonezero.com/zz/templates/sony-zonezero/images/becarios/piza/04.jpg Sony SLT-A57K http://www.zonezero.com/zz/templates/sony-zonezero/images/becarios/piza/05.jpg
Wednesday, 24 October 2012
Author:Webmaster
Arturo Pizá Malvido | Tlaxcala Result of the workshop "Light" given by Eniac Martínez of the Fundación Pedro Meyer November 2012   Arturo Pizá Malvido (Tlaxcala, 1969) is the son of a Sicilian father and a mother from Tamaulipas. He was born flat-footed, with geographic tongue and an IUD incrusted in the cranial suture between the frontal and parietal lobes.   He studied Communication (UIA, D.F.) and has a specialty in audiovisual media (Claustro de Sor Juana, D.F.). He has spent time in Morelos, Quintana Roo, Mexico City and Veracruz, the state where he now lives. He has been an announcer, writer and producer of advertising and cultural projects in different media.   He was a professor of photography and digital images at the Gestalt School of Design in Xalapa, Veracruz. He currently directs his private photographic study in which he explores portraits and nudes at the same time as his advertising work.   INTERVIEW   ZZ. Arturo, you have a Sicilian father and a mother from Tamaulipas, which is an unusual combination. How have your origins marked the way you carry out your projects? A.P. I suppose they did to some extent although, to be frank, I never think about crabs that talk like Brando in a Coppola move. My father was a pilot and blew himself to bits in a plane doing mid-air tricks; that did mark me for life.   ZZ. Are you working on a personal project at the moment? Which one? A.P. The usual one, nudes and the limits of what are permissible. I do “erotic” photographs (in inverted commas) when time and opportunity allow. I have persisted in Bataille’s “unbridgeable gap.”   ZZ. You have been an announcer, writer and producer of advertising and cultural projects, which should make it easy for you to tell stories with pictures, shouldn’t it? A.P. The visual and the written, pictures and words are different languages that should not be at odds with each other, just different and sometimes complementary. There are obviously things or situations that are impossible to describe but there are also beautifully formed sentences and paragraphs and any constructed or incidental image added to them tend to disappoint.   ZZ. The workshop you attended at the Pedro Meyer Foundation focused on “light.” How do you think shadow forms part of your photographic discourse? A.P. At the risk of sounding like a cliché, shadows are like the silence in music. Light and shadow complement each other. One is impossible without the other. It's dialectic and contrapuntal. What I have tried to explain, rather clumsily, was the core of what we had to explore in Eniac Martínez’ workshop.   ZZ. Tell us about a photo you would like to have taken but didn't for some reason. A.P. I’d rather describe a scene of which there are no photographs, but which would be bitterer than Marat's death. It would be Emil Cioran as a small boy and his few friends playing football with a human skull. That would be it.
Wednesday, 24 October 2012
Author:Sancari, Mariela
Wednesday, 19 September 2012 | Read more
Author:Ehekatl
COMING SOON In this section you will regularly find the work and corresponding technical information on the grant holders.
Monday, 27 August 2012
Author:Ehekatl
  THE SONY-ZONEZERO GRANT Every month a full grant is awarded for one of the production workshops offered by the Pedro Meyer Foundation at Casa Coyoacan; grant holders will also be able to work with the new equipment Sony SLT-A57K. Furthermore, their work will be considered for publication in the Sony Corner on ZoneZero. This announcement is open to photography and/ or art students residents in Mexico and interested in creative processes centered on images, of any age or nationality. This grant does not cover transportation and expenses. • Main objective To support creative processes involving images and encourage the creation of high-quality photographic projects. • Selection process Fill out the application form at Apply for the grant  a minimum of ten days before the starting date of the workshop. The selection committee will focus on the personal vision of the applicant and his or her ability to propose a project within the theme of the workshop. All candidates will be notified of the final decision five days before the starting date of the workshop. • Commitments of the recipient The grant holder undertakes to attend the workshop in full, present the project that he or she developed during it and return the Sony SLT-A57K equipment in good condition at the end of the workshop.
Friday, 24 August 2012
21. Attrition
Author:Devaux, Thomas
Tuesday, 07 August 2012 | Read more
Author:Arellano, Melba
Monday, 30 July 2012 | Read more
Author:Frederick Baldwin & Wendy Watriss
Friday, 20 July 2012 | Read more
Author:Webmaster
Pedro Góngora | Ciudad de México Result of the workshop "Portafolios : Edición y producción fotográfica"given by Adriana Raggi and Bruno Bresani of the Fundación Pedro Meyer June 2013 View portfolio Anahit Paula | Ciudad de México Result of the workshop "Bitácora Visual, Introducción al lenguaje fotográfico" given by Nirvana Paz and Xavier Aguirre of the Fundación Pedro Meyer June 2013 View portfolio Mauricio Ramírez | Ciudad de México Result of the workshop "Bitácora Visual, Introducción al lenguaje fotográfico" given by Nirvana Paz and Bruno Bresani of the Fundación Pedro Meyer February 2013 View portfolio Valentina Jiménez | Ciudad de México Result of the workshop "Bitácora Visual, Introducción al lenguaje fotográfico" given by Nirvana Paz and Bruno Bresani of the Fundación Pedro Meyer February 2013 View portfolio Ximena Morfín | Ciudad de México Result of the workshop "Luz Natural, fotografía de moda" given by Carlos Somonte of the Fundación Pedro Meyer December 2012 View portfolio Julio Rivera | Ciudad de México Result of the workshop "Cuerpo y Fotografía" given by Luana Navarro of the Fundación Pedro Meyer November 2012 View portfolio Arturo Piza Malvido | Tlaxcala Result of the workshop "Luz" given by Eniac Martínez of the Fundación Pedro Meyer October 2012 View portfolio
Sunday, 01 July 2012
Author:Ehekatl Hdz.
  Checking our Facebook, Instagram or Tumblr accounts at least once a day has become a Soutine, almost daily practice for millions of Internet users across the globe. One important motivation behind this seductive curiosity is investigating and intruding into the life of another person whom we may or not have met. Much of this fascination would not be possible without the socialization of information and in particular the thousands of photographs that update profiles, blogs and social networks every day that are almost compulsively reviewing an era in which the private immediately passes into the public domain. Why do we like to be seen? We like to construct a fragmented and often pretentious identity to reinforce out sense of belonging, an increasingly important value in modern society, which has also brought millions in profits to those who have been able to exploit this goldmine. However this is not a new phenomenon, as photography as a social and anecdotal act has also undergone fundamental changes since it first emerged. Few of our grandparents or great-grandparents have a single photograph of the early years of their life, as photography was then an activity that required planning, in addition to the resources and time to create a frequently careful, elaborate setup. The event had to be special and unrepeatable: a marriage, anniversary or simply the immortalization of a person in a photograph. Years later, following the first photographic revolution led by Eastman Kodak, the technological advances in camera mobility and the mass production of cameras and films, the social act of photographing was taken to another level. For the first time social photography could consolidate itself in situ as a result of its mobility and the speed of developing and printing. Increasingly events of an everyday nature were captured, going beyond the formal or unique act, and there was even a break with scene engineering; consequently the photographic click became even more democratic. For the first time thousands of families began to capture holidays, meetings and any moments that were intimate or particularly important to the photographer. The latter was no longer required to be professional, and could be any person with the inclination and funds to purchase a camera, which also became an indispensable appliance in contemporary Western life during the second half of the 20th century. From that moment onwards, the way of seeing and showing oneself to the world began to change, and people became aware of the power they possessed to recreate an identity and fabricate a series of social, cultural and consumer values. These gave the majority of the population access to the seductive game of aspiration and status, which had previously been the sphere of only a few privileged persons. In this way, the generation born after 1960 was the first to have an early record of their life through photography, which was initially presented almost exclusively in wooden frames and stage sets, but eventually filled the pages of the increasingly popular family photo albums, in which a single subject could be depicted in dozens of photographs that gradually traced their growing process. Today many of the children photographed in that era perceive these archives as basic tools for constructing their history or, failing this, giving some indication of their origin. In more profound cases they are the study or inspirational material for reconstructing an identity. However, within less than two decades this phenomenon had grown exponentially as a result of the revolution of digital photography and the use of Internet, particularly social networks. In the medium or long term, what will happen to these hundreds of millions of images being produced at such breathtaking speed? Let us look more specifically at the wide sector of persons who are over-photographed today: teenagers and young people belonging to the “millennium generation”, a consequence of the postmodern era: young people born between 1982 and 2000, who have grown up and developed alongside the recent technological revolution. On the other hand, there are also the persons from the generation that preceded that of the Millenium (the less fortunate Generation X defined by Strauss and Howe). Their children, who are now referred to as I gen, children born after 2000, have witnessed the spread of digital photography and from birth have been insistently photographed by parents, relatives and any person with a camera to hand. They are undoubtedly the first generation to have an accurate of their life, starting from their early years and even their first few days. This leads us to ask: what will happen to these children and teenagers who are today being photographed so unbelievably frequently? What will be the uses and implications of this avalanche of images produced every day? Will this archive still constitute fertile material to construct a person’s identity, as it did for the previous generation? And, exploring this point even further: how will the socialization of this material occur? What social or cultural implications will there be when the lives of these people - beginning in their early years – are made public, and how will this affect the relationships between individuals once they possess extensive personal records? To what extent will a life history cease to be an intimate and private act and become public property? And how will these people assimilate the existence of a public record of their early years, which – itself a separate subject – will always represent the viewpoint of whoever took the photographs? And lastly, what will then be the limits of the rights of the photographed subject, who is unaware of the photographs being taken and of the subsequent use of his image? We are perhaps leaping ahead and should instead enquire what percentage of these images remain in the ephemeral sphere and which indeed generate extensive personal archives. Although there are as yet no clear, precise answers, the sense and meaning of what privacy represents and how it is understood will undoubtedly be redefined in the next few years. Thus the manner of telling, narrating and understanding family histories will also somehow change to more complex meta-languages that interact in different spheres. Let us therefore watch carefully to see what the coming years will bring in this regard. It would however be particularly interesting to stop occasionally to think before taking a photograph and automatically sharing it, to think of the image as a living entity that will have various meanings, uses and reinterpretations over time, both for the viewer and the subject of the photograph. We should therefore ask ourselves why we photograph and above all what we wish to convey and record when we take and socialize images. As we have seen on several occasions, in order to understand the direction that our reflection is taking we will have to answer these questions with more questions.
Wednesday, 27 June 2012

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